Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters. 

Colossians [3:23] 

The Epistle of Paul to the Colossians, or simply Colossians, is the twelfth book of the New testament. Likely written sometime between 55AD and 60AD, while the Apostle Paul sat in a Roman prison. Colossians is one of four letters Paul wrote while held as a prisoner. The other three are; Ephesians, Philemon, and Philippians. They are called as a group the Prison Epistles. Even in prison, Paul continued to write to many of the churches he started during his three missionary journeys.  

The letter to the Colossians was written to get these churches back on track in serving only Christ. But, unfortunately, it seems they had started taking shortcuts in their practices and introduced pagan rituals in worship services. One verse that hit home for me was in chapter 3, verse 23, which says, Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters. While a reminder not to take shortcuts in our relationship with Jesus or religious practices, it is also a reminder of how we conduct ourselves when we work. 

Paul is reminding us to work heartily and with quality in all that we do. And there is no better reminder than to always work with all your heart as if we are working for the Lord.  Wow, imagine the change in our efforts if we know whatever we do, we do for Jesus. This thought would undoubtedly make each effort we put into work more meaningful. So while this message was essential to the Colossians two thousand years ago, it is just as relevant today.  

As I was sitting one morning thinking about this message from Paul, it made me think about my brother-in-law Ken and my wife Connie, putting up a picture gallery of our relatives in our new home. There was a blank wall in one of the hallways that seemed to them to be a great place to put up pictures of our grandparents, our parents when they were younger, and even great-grandparents—a wonderful reminder of our roots.  

After visiting Lowes to get all the required material, Connie and Ken looked at the wall and discussed how to make the placements mean something and in what order. Then they began the laborious effort of measuring and rethinking each placement. Next, they carefully prepared each picture to be hung. A process that required exact precision to ensure each image hung evenly. I noticed how much time was spent preparing and thinking before they hung the pictures while wondering if I would have the same patience.  

Soon, they began hanging each picture while continuing to debate, measure, and assess each placement. This was no haphazard effort. So much thought went into each step; no shortcuts! I enjoyed listening to the banter and discussion, and it allowed me to feel the quality of their efforts.  

Then they proudly announced it was done. Both looking at their work, satisfied each picture hung properly. When I walked around the corner to see the gallery, I was stunned! Not just at the quality of the work, but seeing how the quality of preparation showed itself in the results. This is what the Apostle Paul was talking about with work as if working for the Lord. 

While this is a simple story, it is a reminder to be patient in our work. Not just do something to get it done, but to do it well. Sure it might seem it takes longer, but in actuality, it is a shorter and more sustainable effort.  

Sometimes, we might hurry to get something done only to be met with having to redo our work or end up with shoddy work. It is human nature to want to complete our to-do lists quickly. But Paul is telling us not to be expedient, instead to work as if working for the Lord.  

I can only imagine if a workplace had this mindset, what wonderful products would be produced. The decisions that would be made would always represent high Christian ethics, and customers would always be happy—by simply taking the time to work as if Jesus is standing next to us. 

He will show you a large room upstairs, all furnished. Make preparations there. 

Luke [22:12] 

When Ryan first came into my office eight years ago, I noticed something different about him. He was unusually polite and used words like; yes sir and thank you. He listened intently and would wait to insert his opinion politely. Quickly the conversation became a mutual exchange of ideas and methods.  

I had spotted him during my tours through his department and wondered about his skills. The visit to my office was for me to find out more about him, by giving him a project. We reviewed the project requirements and together established a timeline with expected outcomes.  

Before the project deadline, Ryan came into my office with his completed project, which also included extra materials. There were no mistakes in his work. He delivered his work earlier than expected with additional value.  

Naturally, I gave him more work with increasing responsibility and freedom. Again, he consistently exceeded expectations.  

As time went on, I got to know Ryan better. At twenty-five, he had earned his pilot’s license. In fact, he was a flight instructor at a small local airport. He had graduated from college with honors. A quiet person who read the room well and spoke when it was his time. Never insistent he was heard, but always clear with his facts.  

As time wore on, I tried to have lunch with Ryan periodically. Primarily to offer him my help and learn more about him. I heard the dreams about his life and his pending marriage to his girlfriend. I learned his parents and grandparents were influential in his life. He spoke about his family with pride. Ryan is a person who was grateful for what he has and not one to pick at slights in his life. He is a hopeful person.  

During these conversations, I started to sense he had another mission in life other than being a business person. Aviation was his passion. When he talked about aviation, this subdued person became animated.  

He had been dutiful in following his parents’ lead to pursue a career in business. And he was good at business. But the business world wasn’t his passion.  

At one point, I asked him what did he really want to do in his life? Stumbling with his words, he told me he always to be a pilot for a national airline. He wanted to fly people around the country. He loved flying and all the electronics associated with aviation. Flying was his real passion. 

We discussed this, and I told him, follow your passion. Knowing that passion produces excellence and joy in life. He was surprised I told him this, assuming I would try to talk him out of becoming a pilot. It was his dream, not mine.  

Ryan did leave the company to become a pilot. At first, he was a trainee and flew prop planes. Later rising up to being a regional co-pilot flying Jets. He moved from the area he grew up in to be closer to his work.  

I remember the day he called with pride to tell me he was now a pilot for a small regional airline and no longer the co-pilot. As time wore on, I wondered how he was doing. His name would come up here and there. But like all of us, our life’s paths cross here and there. Ryan was very supportive of my books and has bought everyone. He always gave me feedback on what he thought about my books. 

I don’t hear from Ryan every day or even every month. Maybe once or twice a year. When we talked, it became a time to connect the events from the last time we spoke. Sometimes he needed a reference, which I always eagerly provided.  

Then the day came; he was about to be given the pilot job he always wanted. He was being considered to be a pilot for a national airline. He texted me to see if I could be his reference. And of course, I said yes. My reference was only needed for the airline to verify everything they already knew about Ryan,   

Over the last eight years, Ryan had shared his life with me. I knew what he wanted in his life. I knew when Ryan was disappointed and when he was excited. But on this day, his dream was coming true, and he needed one more phone call from me.  

Ryan hadn’t called just once over the years, but frequently enough for me to know about and watch his life. So when the final request came in, I eagerly helped.  

Unwittingly, Ryan exhibited the real process of networking. Ryan didn’t set out with a plan to call me in exactly eight years and ask for a reference. Instead, he mutually involved me in his life—a relationship where there is both receiving and giving. 

When I speak to students on college campuses and talk about networking, I always tell them networking is a lifelong activity with a genuine effort to be mutual. Nurturing these relationships is vital to them having a solid network.  

In my career counseling work, where I help people find a new job, those with strong networks have an easier time. The statistics bear this out. At the professional level, sixty to eighty percent of all jobs are found through a person’s network.  

People love to help out people that have been positive and trustworthy associates. A person’s network contains people who are like bumblebees that spread the pollen of a person’s ability throughout the business and professional world.  

Even Jesus used his network to obtain what he needed during his three-year ministry on earth. On His last trip to Jerusalem, he needed a room to have one last supper with his disciples. Jesus sent the two Apostles Peter and John, ahead to secure a place for this supper. Jesus sent the two men to a man he knew from the past and told Peter and John. He will show you a large room upstairs, all furnished. Make preparations there. (Luke [22:12]) 

On the surface, this may seem a little odd for Jesus to assume someone would give Him a room. The owner was someone Jesus had met and helped in the past. Who was now more than willing to return the favor.  

So while this could be viewed as a supernatural event, it still contains the value of networking. Jesus spent considerable time during His ministry on earth building social networks. All done through mutual relationships, which included the two most important factors of networking, giving and receiving.  

Networks are built over a lifetime and always need to be nurtured. I know I am not the only one Ryan stayed in touch. He has other friends as well, some of who I know. Ryan will undoubtedly continue to be a great pilot, and he will need help from time to time. He will also, from time to time, help others. We, who know Ryan, know this.

Work as if working for the Lord Christ.

Colossians [3:23]-24

Recently I received an email promotion that said I had won a free airline ticket. Immediately I opened the email to see how I had won a free airline ticket. Suspicious, I scoured the fine print and discovered I really hadn’t won a ticket. It was just a request to read more about the company and had a minimal chance of winning the ticket. In return, I would have to fill out a lengthy form, which asked for things like a phone number, my address, and email address. Quickly, I deleted the email and thought to myself, why be so deceptive?

It probably seemed like a good idea to the company, hoping to land new customers. In reality, it likely turned off a lot of potential buyers. Why not just send an email that explained the benefits of doing business with the company. Or better yet, provide excellent customer service to the loyal customers and let word of mouth generate more sales.

Too often, we receive these suspicious emails, which do nothing more than clutter up our email. It makes me wonder, How would Jesus want businesses to create raving fans? I am pretty sure Jesus would want these businesses to take a different approach. He would like them to treat their customers as they wanted to be treated. Jesus would ask them to hire people committed to providing great customer service. These businesses should also produce a product as if they are working for the Lord. And finally, always be truthful. Four simple but essential business practices to attract lifelong customers and, in the process, create raving fans.

The Golden Rule

In Matthew [7:12], Jesus says, whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets. This is wise advice. Before we put any marketing effort to work, we should ask ourselves, Is this the way we want to be treated? If our answer is no, then we shouldn’t. Deceptive methods in marketing will never produce raving fans of our business. Instead, our reputation will be sullied.

Loyal customers who are raving fans will create a firm foundation for any business. Not only that, they will provide repeat business and attract other customers. We should never forget that most purchases from new customers come from the reviews of the existing customers. Yes, Jesus is giving us wise customer service advice with the Golden Rule.

Hire Great People and Pay Them Well

In the Parable of the Talents, Jesus tells the story of a manager who had to leave for a while. The manager gave his three employees tasks to perform while he was gone. Two of the employees did their job and doubled their efforts. When the manager came back and saw the bounty created, he gave them a raise and more responsibility.

I am sure all current business managers would want these two people working in their company. These workers are the type of people who will also treat customers in the same manner by going the extra mile to make sure the customer is satisfied. Over time having workers like this changes culture and helps sales.

Continually seeking great employees and treating them well will always produce excellent results. And managers should be quick to reward, and these rewards will reinforce what is required.

Produce Products As If They Are For the Lord

Having the right attitude and the right employees is very important. Equally important is to produce quality products. Jesus has a simple mindset to accomplish this facet of business, work as if working for the Lord Christ. (Colossians [3:23]-24) What a great perspective! Simply work and produce products you would proud to give to Jesus.

All flaws in production would be attended to immediately. Saving money at the customer’s expense by not addressing product quality is a flawed strategy. Companies that employ this attitude will have people meet to collaborate to make sure everything has been properly thought through.

The company would quickly become a place that desires to create raving fans. A commitment to excellent customer service will replace a penny-wise, dollar foolish mindset. In turn, the company will become far more sustainable than one which cuts corners.

Never Deceive Customers or Employees

In business, there is always the temptation to stretch further than you should in generating sales or a better outcome. Perhaps the pressure of making sure you hit a certain sales number to make the month-end goals. We have all witnessed this in our business careers. And perhaps in the short term, these efforts produce the immediate desired results.

However, lurking in the future is a payback moment that will often be greater than short-term gains. Customers will sometimes complain about the deception. But most will avoid the confrontation and silently begin moving away. It will show up in reviews posted on the internet. Soon, the once-strong sales base will become weak.

Maintaining a strong sense of Christian ethics will help avoid this dilemma. It may sound corny, but if all our actions are connected to the often-used phrase; What would Jesus do, short-term decisions will be replaced with longer-term choices.

Customers are the life-blood of every business. Serving these customers well will ensure a great future for any company. Every company’s goals should start with making their customers raving fans. It doesn’t happen with deceitful marketing efforts. It happens with a company’s commitment to excellence, great employees, truthfulness, and empathy for the customer. We only need to turn to the lessons of Jesus to create an environment that, in turn, makes raving fans.

“ One thing I do know, that though I was blind, now I see.”

— John [9:25]

THE “AMAZING” STORY OF JOHN NEWTON’S JOURNEY TO WRITING AMAZING GRACE

John Newton, the former slave ship captain, wrote the famous Christian hymn “Amazing Grace.” Included in the lyrics is the verse from John [9:25], “Was blind, but now I see.” However, John Newton’s past was very checkered. He was known for extraordinarily bad language. One sea captain considered his vocabulary the worst of any seaman he had encountered. He frequently was disobedient and  even was forced to spend time as a slave in Sierra Leone. In spite of his life’s circumstances he continued to be drawn to the sea. Because he was an extraordinarily good seaman, his faults were often overlooked. He endured a number of close calls at sea, where his ships were either close to sinking or in such bad weather that men were washed overboard. Even though he had turned away from God, during these difficult moments he would still cry out, “God have mercy.”

It was through these moments that Newton began to turn to a different life. He became associated with the early Methodist movement in England and became well known to John Wesley. Wesley encouraged him to write and become a pastor. Later he became a rector at a small Anglican church. While at this church he helped write hymns. Included with these hymns was the song “Amazing Grace.” Later in his life,Newton became an avowed abolitionist and was a good friend of William Wilberforce, the person largely responsible for ending the slave trade in England. 

“Overtime, the continued proximity to death and a restless heart forced him deeper into his relationship with Christ.”

John’s conversion occurred over a number of years. He would come close to turning his life around and then fall back. Overtime, the continued proximity to death and a restless heart forced him deeper into his relationship with Christ. And then it became inevitable and it eventually took hold. It was at this point that he was no longer blind, but could see. The words to “Amazing Grace” were many years off, but he could see. 

“Jesus’s healing of the blind man symbolizes our own moment of seeing and giving in to having a relationship with God.”

Today’s verse is about a blind man Jesus healed. The local religious elite, seeking to discredit Jesus, were questioning the blind man, whose sight had been restored. Today’s verse is the blind man’s answer to his questioners. Jesus’s healing of the blind man symbolizes our own moment of seeing and giving in to having a relationship with God. Like Newton we fight back and sometimes have to endure a great deal of hardship before we see. We struggle at times to pursue this relationship with God. Sometimes we are in and at other times we are out. But God persists through Jesus to bring our sight back. We get close and fall back.

Then at some moment the events of our lives tip over our resistance and we are now no longer blind. 

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

 


PARTING THOUGHTS

How is our story similar to John Newton’s?

What holds us back from accepting Jesus?

When do we see?

truck driving

The giving in to the compelling spirit of God and satisfying our own yearning, can and will place us at a crossroad. The path we take can heal us, but sometimes comes at a high earthly cost.

Exhausted Majority

The Exhausted Majority: A New American Phenomenon

A year-long study by the organization called More in Common, concluded that as many as three quarters of Americans are exhausted from the tribe-like actions of our political leaders, and national press. They are exhausted from learning the ever-changing landscape of political correctness.

More in Common termed this large group of our population as the “Exhausted Majority.” 

This group is tired of the tribalism shown by our politicians. Politicians who must go along to get along. Forced to listen to the fringe and nervous leadership, they succumb to the pressure by voting along party lines. Creating a scenario where our representatives no longer work for the people as patriots, but as slaves to a few.

Bombast has become the key to riches.

We see this in the wide and diverse group of Democrats running for President in 2020. Are they really running patriotically or to garner fame, even if it is notorious? Fame that leads to mega book deals and lucrative speaking engagements.

As an author, I am well aware of the value of notoriety. When I first started writing, a senior publishing executive told me, “In this day and age, being a quality writer isn’t enough to get your books sold. You have to be famous or bombastic if you want to be an author.” As many of my fellow authors do, I chose the path of producing the best literature I can, as opposed to bombast. My critically well received book, Jesus & Co., which has 5 stars on Amazon, would sell better if I had used bombast. But like most authors, I choose to inform versus fame.

The same is true with speaker engagements. It seems our political leaders have heard the same thing. Joe Biden, for instance has made $15 million in the two years since he left the White House.

Bombast sells and the national network knows this. CNN and Fox will interpret any Trump action very differently. As well as, ensure that Trump news is first on the list. Left behind is the real facts and forcing this group, called the Exhausted Majority to tune both out.

While Fox and CNN claim large audiences, they represent only 2% of Americans. But that 2% is a large voice, even though it doesn’t reflect the real values of the majority. People want to hear news that isn’t biased and just the facts.

The long bastion of news accuracy, The New York Times claims it prints, “All The News That Is Fit to Print.” However, this is no longer true. It too has succumbed to printing only what it thinks its readers what to hear.

Who has control?

The number of media companies that control our news is very small. In 1983, 90% of US media was controlled by fifty companies. Today, 90% of the national media is far more concentrated at only 6, according to Business Insider. Leaving those who produce the news few options other than pleasing the views of their owners.

In my book, Your Faith Has Made You Well, a highly emphasized point is the value of the truth in our faith lives. Jesus himself declared, “I am the light of the world and the truth shall set you free.” As Christians the truth is an important part of our religion. It is also an important part of any nations discourse, especially in America.

It would be a brave choice to produce unbiased journalism, the risk is to lose the few zealots that are actually watching.

Our religious speak, as well is governed by political correctness. It is no longer polite to say Merry Christmas in some quarters. And certainly many large corporations refrain from Christian association for fear of the backlash. Being open about being Christian risks offending. Despite the fact that 70% of Americans are professed Christians.

However, companies like Chick-Fil-A, Tysons Foods and Forever 21 are open about their belief and produce superior operating results. They are not afraid of publicly stating they are Christian and their results prove them right. People trust Christians, regardless of the discourse we hear from a few. But fear of reprisal from the keepers of political correctness keep most away from declaring their Christian values.

The Exhausted Majority are just that, exhausted.

They are tired of talking heads claiming what Americans want, but ignore the voices of reason. They are tired of those who look for any weakness in a person to defame, while ignoring the good. This group wants to be heard, but won’t speak up for fear of reprisal. They calmly retreat to the security of friends to express their points of view.

Our social media funnels information to people through sophisticated algorithms to ensure we hear what we like to hear, and not what is needed to be heard. Further collapsing a national dialogue of all the facts.

Many that I talk to about the Exhausted Majority, immediately identify.

They will tell me they also, have many friends who feel the same. They don’t want to be told what to say or have to watch obviously biased news. They have tuned out the voices of bias and turned to friends for news.

While rancor and discord have always been part of the American landscape, the size of the Exhausted Majority is unusually large. Created by facts that are only half the story and propelled by a small group from the fringe. And an even smaller group in the media.

Americans want the truth and want fairness. This has always been our way, it is what makes our country remarkably unique.

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

end of watch

American Greatness – The End of Watch Call

Jesus said, “Blessed are those pure of heart, for they shall see God” (Matthew 5:8).

Our country is filled with unheralded heroes. Those that don’t seek self-promotion or use bombast to be recognized. Their hearts are only pointed to serving others. They work for our good and for God, not seeking fame, but to serve.

Many of our firefighters fit this model.

They mostly serve as volunteers in local fire departments. They don’t get paid to serve, they just show up. They are the men and women who rush into burning buildings to bring people to safety. Their joy is in saving and not gaining.

When they pass into our Lord’s hands, they are given an “End of Watch” call—broadcast over the airwaves to announce that their service and time is complete. The fire volunteers upon hearing this call offer them a moment of silence. It is a moving gesture of recognition.

Louis “Lou” Aroneo was on one of those men. He died this July and received his “End of Watch” call from the Stirling, New Jersey Fire Department. But Lou is more than just an individual who received a last call. He represented what makes America a special place. In his life, he represented a way to live life. A way our forefathers taught us. A way that included honor, respect, duty, and service. Lou didn’t curse the darkness but instead chose to light candles.

Lou had no special privileges in life.

He wasn’t a star athlete or a famed entertainer or even a noted politician. He was part of the tapestry of men and women known as first responders. Lou didn’t go to Harvard or Yale; he went to a local college and became an engineer.

While some will seek fame through rancor, Lou sought kindness. While some sought self-promotion, Lou sought to serve. Some seek to tear down, Lou sought to build up.

He had a wife and raised his children in a small town in New Jersey. He passed on to our Lord with a very ordinary resume. A simple life on paper, but rich life in the hearts of the people he helped and served.

Even though he received a medal of honor for rushing into a burning building to rescue a wheelchair-bound individual, there will be no movie made about his exploits. Even though he raised his children to honor and respect others, no book will be written about his excellence. Lou lived his life the right way. A uniquely American way.

I take it upon myself to declare Lou a hero.

Because he lived the way we all should live, with quiet faith and desire to do good. Lou’s life compass was pointed to doing what was right and without compromise. Noting that perhaps we as Americans we should strive harder to recognize these people as the heroes. We should read about them more or see them on television. Perhaps knowing more about these heroes will soften the drums of discord.

Lou would be the first to point out he wasn’t special, he knew many others who lived the same life. And he would have been right, many others do. Our country needs these standard-bearers of commitment and service. They are the ones who are there in times of disaster. Lou and his fire company stood on the shores of New Jersey during 9/11 to help. They stood in line waiting to help those devastated by Superstorm Sandy. They are the ones carrying children late at night from a house fire. They are the ones who are first on the scene of a terrible car wreck. They are the first eyes you see when you need to be rescued. They work, while we sleep. They are American first responders. They serve because they are supposed to serve.

I only wish that I knew Lou before I completed my latest book, Your Faith Has Made You Well. He would have been a terrific character to stand beside the dozens of other ordinary heroes, who are portrayed. As Christians, we can never have enough heroes of faith. Lou stood tall among them.

As a country, we need heroes like Lou.

These are the people who don’t use social media to bring them fame through bombast. They don’t like to jockey for position to get what they want. These heroes seek only to help.

Every day we see these unnoticed heroes in our midst. They walk in supermarkets, hotel lobbies, or along crowded streets. They have blended in to live their lives without notice.

Look hard though and you will see them walking among us. They hold doors for others. They stop and pick up litter. They speak kindly to others. They have faces that show their integrity. They help parents overloaded with groceries. They are with us every day.

Lou passed on to our Lord on July 3. He had a funeral procession that included nine ladder trucks decorated with American flags and a long waiting line of people giving their last respects. Lou didn’t pass on with millions in the bank or with lasting notoriety. He passed with a more blessed legacy, a peaceful assurance that he would reside with his Lord from living an honorable life. While maybe not recognized fully by the world, it certainly was recognized where he is today, with his Lord for eternity. America needs more heroes like Lou.

Lou did get his last call.

A time-honored tradition for firefighters. He was the Chief of Stirling’s fire department and was sent off to be with God, having served humankind with honor. Many other first responders will go after him and they as well will receive the last call. Their special moment when the dispatcher says: “End of watch call! You have completed your mission here and been a good friend to all. Now it is time to rest. Thank you for your service.”

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

Photo Credit: iStock/Getty Images

This article was originally posted on American Greatness

mister rogers

Mr. Rogers and His Neighborhood Could Help Change America’s Discourse of Anger

Fred Rogers, or more commonly known as Mister Rogers, died in 2003 of stomach cancer. In his lifetime he produced almost nine hundred TV shows for children. He wrote over one hundred original songs for the show and created thirteen operas. Each morning, from 1968 to 2001, children throughout our country were invited into Mr. Rogers neighborhood.

In 1997 Fred Rogers received a Lifetime achievement Emmy. During his speech he mesmerized the crowd of famous actors and actresses with his speech and brought many to tears. He created one very special moment when he asked them all to take ten seconds to recall all the people who had made them famous. He said, “I will watch the time.” And did so, as all in the audience thought back on all those who had helped them. Fred turned his moment of glory into other people’s moments of glory with this simple gesture.

He ended his speech by saying, “Thank you for allowing me all these years to be your neighbor, God be with you.”

Fred was forty before he became Mr. Rogers in 1968. Prior to this Fred had worked at NBC studios in NYC as a manager. Where he learned his craft of production and show management. Later he moved to WQED, a PBS affiliate in Pittsburgh. Over a few years he slowly developed the concepts that would come to be known as Mr. Rogers Neighborhood.

He had graduated from Rollins College in Florida as a music major, which became an important part of the show production. In the early sixties he went to Bible college and graduated as an ordained minister.

Fred’s faith was always evident in his actions. His humble way of speaking with his head cocked subtly to the right endeared many to love him. While Fred was mild mannered and gracious in his speech, his show addressed difficult societal issues. Early on in Mr. Rogers Neighborhood, he addressed civil rights. Sitting by a wading pool he invited an African American Policeman to put his feet in the pool with him.

They talked about life as equals.

At the end as they were leaving the pool, Fred Rogers dried his companion’s feet. On the issue of divorce, a serious issue for the children who watched the show. He used his puppets to explain divorce and ensure that the children who were watching and affected by divorce learned that it wasn’t their fault.

On the difficult issues of life, Fred stood up and addressed them. Not with bombast or highly charged language of blaming. But with a mild manner that explored issues from all sides and allowed the viewer to grow threw the truth.

Mr. Rogers for President

Perhaps Mr. Rogers should have been a presidential candidate. He had all the right qualities. He listened to learn. He talked softly, but firmly. His first concern was always to encourage and make people better. There was no self interest in Fred.

Today, we see many of our leaders divided on the lines of identity. Some are Republicans and some are Democrats. Some are conservatives and some are liberals.

These are secondary classifications to that of being Americans. Yet our leaders use their secondary identities to dictate their speech, not patriotism. We have become a country mired in partisan identities. Fred would have showed them how to play well in the sandbox. Perhaps a trait we so dearly need today.

The great divide

Our country today is mired in angry discourse, in a recent Pew Research poll, it shows 67% of Americans are tired of the one-sided positions of our leaders. They are an “Exhausted Majority.” Fed up with the arguing and rancor.

As a country where 90% of its populace believe in God and over 70% are professed Christians. Many of our citizens are afraid of stating their religious views, fearing they will offend someone. Saying “Merry Christmas” invites rebuke. Yet Fred Rogers would say Merry Christmas and in many of his speeches he mentioned his faith and wasn’t afraid to say, “May God be with you.”

In my book, Your Faith Has Made You Well, it spells out the value of loving your neighbor and the impact on an individual’s outlook. And neighbors were important to Fred, on his show constantly asked, “Won’t you be my neighbor.” A phrase right out of the Bible. It was Jesus’ second commandment. Fred didn’t pick and choose his neighbor, all were his neighbor.

He was bullied

Sure people made fun of Fred, he was used to it. As a child he was bullied and set apart. Forcing him to spend many hours alone. He retreated into a world of puppets, that would later become the hallmark of his show. His puppets didn’t produce rancor, but kind conversations.

In those dark nights of his life as a child, he created a world that he felt we should all live in. A world that sought understanding and led with kindness.

He never backed down from his gentle wholesomeness. Yet he powerfully educated a generation or two of children.

If I could, I would have voted for Fred to lead our nation. He wasn’t weak, even though he was mild. He was firm in his beliefs, when others mocked. He stayed on his course and saw every moment as a chance to uplift and encourage.

He was loved because he loved.

Dr. Bruce L Hartman, Christian Author and Story Teller. A former Fortune 500 CFO who left the corporate world to engage in a ministry of “Connecting The Lessons of the Gospels to the Modern Life.” His life mission is “Helping People Walk into a Brighter Future.” He is the author of Jesus & Co. and Your Faith Has Made You Well.

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

Article originally posted in Reactionary Times

One Final Walk On the Appalachian Trail (For Now)

“Be careful how you live, live like those who are wise. Make the most of every opportunity and understand what the Lord wants you to do.”

Ephesians [5:15]-17

 

Final Walk

On a clear and humidity free summer day, I made the final walk of our journey on the Appalachian Trail, in a remote part of Maine. Along with me was my mother and sister-in-law, Penny. The ending was perfect; the weather, the trail, great companions and no bugs! These were the final steps on a journey that began in March.

We decided to stop the hike in New York, and go to Maine. Beset with sore knees that no longer recovered in a day or two and having endured a fourth illness, it was time to stop and rest. We went to Maine to be with my mother on her birthday and visit family. After which we will travel to Ohio to visit Connie’s parents and sisters. Then a final trip to visit our daughter, Savannah, in Seattle.

The rocks proved too much for us

The constant grind of stepping carefully over the many obstacles injured our knees. We had also noticed a different demographic over the last month. Young and fit hikers were all we saw. Sure there were a few people over forty, but those left from a journey that started many miles earlier, had much younger legs. They glided swiftly by us, on an appointed mission. While we were tired and worn down.

Family became a draw for us, as well as a publisher who wanted to become very involved in my new book release on September 3rd. So we packed up our memories and moved forward.

For the last hike, I chose to go to a place of my first walk on the Appalachian Trail forty one years ago. The remote wilderness of the Bigelow Range. Forty one years ago, with my good friend, Steve, I entered this wilderness and created a life-long love for the trail. On a three day hike with much heavier equipment than exists today, we walked the entire length of this difficult section, which followed many other journeys. Life of raising children and pursuing a career filled in this forty year gap.

But this day, was for sharing.

Mom and Penny

Bringing Penny and my mom to see the wonderful life that exists, away from the bustle of modern life. A day to show them how to use hiking poles and what to observe when you walk. We went up a few moderate climbs and they learned the technique of climbing and that descending was much harder. I was especially proud of their zeal and willingness to try.

They did well.

My mom, at eighty six, stepped carefully and skillfully down the declines and after a few steps looked like a seasoned hiker. Penny embraced the woods and gleefully looked at the trees.

We had lunch sitting on the rocks on the shore of Flagstaff lake. A simple lunch that I packed in the morning, consisting of peanut butter, triscuits, raisins and a cookie. Just like what Connie and I had every day. We sat observing the peacefulness of a blue lake without the roars of motorboats and few sounds of civilization.

On the way home, we had no cell service and the car navigation system broke. Leaving us to find our way home, the old fashion way. By remembering landmarks we had seen on the way up and an atlas that Penny used. My mom did most of the remembering and helped keep us on course. Revealing a keen mind for the little things we often miss when we use modern navigation. Teamwork at its best.

I am sad we didn’t finish we what started out to do, and know some will say we failed. But I don’t feel like we failed. We hiked hundreds of miles and climbed countless peaks. On some days we marched over twenty miles. We strengthened our endurance through the many days of hiking six to eight hours.

We stepped close to three million times on this journey. Climbed close to a quarter of a million feet or the equivalent of Mount Everest 10 times.

We were in the arena that Teddy Roosevelt talked about many years earlier. We were not victors, we can only claim that we participated. But life isn’t about the critics who sit watching those in the arena, it is about those who try. These words by Teddy Roosevelt resonate today.

Remembering Our First Day

I remembered our first day, which opened our eyes to what this trek required. How hard the day was and the encouraging people that propelled us forward. Or the third day, when we were pelted with ice. Or the day in Virginia when we climbed five thousand feet. The day we went to “Fat Man Squeeze” and I actually got through. Or on one of our final days, climbing up a steep rock formation. We changed from the first day to today, and I suppose that is the purpose of this trek.

We learned the subtleties of nature.

I personally, began to lose my fear of exposed heights. We learned that those who shared the wilderness with us, are an optimistic and pleasantly polite people.

We also learned that a good life can be led simply. Away from the distractions and lures of modern life. We learned life doesn’t have to be a life surrounded by things, but a life of purpose. Not looking for things to do, but a guided life to do good and help others.

I will miss the morning routine of getting ready to hike. I will miss climbing up steep hills, lunch by streams, the surprising encounters with wildlife and the fatigued feeling at the end of the day.

We learned about the importance of water and how to get water many miles from a faucet. We learned about staying fueled, not with a lot of food, but just the right amount.

We met amazing people with wonderful names, like Single Track, the Caribbean Queen, Camel, Coldfoot, Pippi Rambo, The Rev, Journeyman and so many others. Each visit involved smiles.

My last hike was one hundred and sixty miles from our goal, Mount Katahdin. But now it is time to return and move forward with our lives. As Connie once asked, “Who knew we would love the mountains and lakes?” We will return to a life that involves continuing to hike and mountain bike. But also a life to help our children, help others, write and visit family.

Perhaps I will return again next spring to the trail I love.

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman

Leave No Trace, The Seven Rules of Life on the Appalachian Trail

While walking the trail in New York with our daughter, Taylor, I realized that one of the important lessons about walking this trail, was to Leave No Trace.” There are no trash cans on the trail, maybe some at a trailhead. But as hikers we are asked to carry out our own trash. As part of the literature produced by the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, it highlights these rules. There are seven rules.

The first is Plan Ahead and Prepare.

This means to know where you are going and prepare for extreme weather. Simply, let others on the outside know where you will be and to know the weather and terrain. This rule is designed to avoid the impact of being rescued. While in the Smokies we witnessed this first hand. A major storm was brewing and winds of over sixty miles an hour would occur, along with severe cold and snow. It was a surprise storm and thankfully we were prepared and able to flee from the storm. Others weren’t as lucky and some had to be rescued.

The second is Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces.

Essentially stay on the marked travel or camp in existing/designated spots. By doing this the existing fauna and vegetation is undisturbed. It meant many times we had to walk in small groups and single file. For the most part of all the existing campsites were well marked. This was a rule we seldom saw broken and showed the respect for nature by the hikers.

The third rule is Dispose of Waste Properly.

Simply, pack it in and pack it out. But it also meant that when you had to go to the bathroom outdoors away from designated areas, clean up when you are done. Put human waste in a six inch hole that you dig with a trowel. As well as, be at least two hundred feet from water.

 I usually carried a plastic bag and would put my paper waste in a bag, along with litter I found on the trail. Disposing of the bag when I found an appropriate receptacle. Interestingly, away from the roads or trailheads there was little litter, speaking to the respect other hikers had for the trail.

The fourth rule is Minimize Campfire Impacts.

Hikers love campfires, but they can be dangerous. Generally there was a campfire ring at most of the campsites, and that is the place to have a campfire. But also to keep it small and only include sticks that can be broken by hand. As well as, ensure the fire is out before you leave and diffuse the cooled ashes. It also means not bringing wood from home, as this might introduced pests or other diseases that could affect the environment.

The fifth rule is Leave What You Find.

In other words, examine but don’t take, including rocks! It also means to not build structures or dig trenches. If you have been away from the trail for a while, to clean your boot soles. Simply, leave the environment the way you found it.

The sixth rule is Respect Wildlife.

This includes not feeding wildlife or leaving food when you leave. Habituating animals to food is dangerous for them and fellow hikers. Bears in particular become easily attached to food and will become more aggressive. Sometimes it means waiting a few moments for a snake to leave the trail or a deer to stop feeding. We actually had to wait ten minutes once for a deer to clear the trail before we passed. Never approach any wildlife and always observe from afar.

The seventh rule is Be Considerate of Others.

Simple things, like on a single lane trail allow the uphill hiker to pass. If on a flat stretch be the person who stands aside. Keep pets under control and especially with dogs, have them on a leash. The hikers we met with dogs were especially courteous. We only had one encounter with a dog that made us leave the area. A trail friend named her “Lady Barksalot.” In camp she would bark constantly and was hard on her owners. She was under two and it was her first experience on the trail. The owner acknowledged she needed more training.

For the most part these rules were well followed.

However, there was one event which showed why these rules were important. As we were walking we met a man who informed us there was a bear on the trail who wouldn’t leave. While he was excited that he got a video of the bear, a rare feat, he was nervous and asked if we would walk with him by the bear. My instincts told me to say no, and instead we stopped for lunch. We went to a nearby shelter and it was there we discovered why the bear was stubbornly hanging around.

A group was using the shelter as a campsite for day hikes and left their food hanging from trees. While they were away the bear smelled the food and came to investigate. Bears have a keen sense of smell and can pick up a scent from miles away. If the group had taken their food with them, the bear would not have visited the area. Bears are naturally shy and will avoid human contact. So even if you are carrying food they will avoid any interaction. But food left alone, is an invitation!

Leaving food for a bear to find is both dangerous to the bear and other hikers. As the bear gets used to the food they become more aggressive. They become a threat to themselves and others.

When we arrived at Harpers Ferry, before we could get our hikers badge at the Appalachian Trail Conservancy center, we had to pass a test on Leave no Trace. Luckily we passed with a little help from the examiner.

I would say from my experience these last few months, those who walk in the wilderness, respect the wilderness. A powerful statement about their sense of responsibility to keeping nature uncluttered.

Blessings, until next time,
Bruce L. Hartman